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Hope you are doing well! Here are some activities to help you as you continue on your journey to learning Spanish. I will be changing/adding activities, so be sure to keep checking. If you have any questions or want to practice Spanish with me, you can call, email or text me. Check my contact information. You might want to call a classmate and practice together! I miss our class time together! Stay safe and remember that I am thinking about you!

 

**Read the selection below on Cinco de mayo and then play Cinco de mayo BINGO. Look for items, recipes, words in the reading, foods that you ate and mark the block.  For example, if you ate salsa, you can mark that block. smiley Be sure to watch the video on Cinco de mayo on the Educational Websites section or look for some on your own!laughlaugh

CINCO DE MAYO HISTORY

 

This site was awarded a Times Pick by the Los Angeles Times on 5/1/1997!!

The 5th of May is not Mexican Independence Day, but is should be ! And Cinco de Mayo is not an American holiday, but it should be. Mexico declared its independence from mother Spain on midnight, the 15th of September, 1810. And it took 11 years before the first Spanish soldiers were told and forced to leave Mexico.

So, why Cinco de Mayo? And why should Americans savor this day as well? Because 4,000 Mexican soldiers smashed the French and traitor Mexican army of 8,000 at Puebla, Mexico, 100 miles east of Mexico City on the morning of May 5, 1862.

The French had landed in Mexico (along with Spanish and English troops) five months earlier on the pretext of collecting Mexican debts from the newly elected government of democratic President (and Indian) Benito Juarez. The English and Spanish quickly made deals and left. The French, however, had different ideas.

Under Emperor Napoleon III, who detested the United States, the French came to stay. They brought a Hapsburg prince with them to rule the new Mexican empire. His name was Maximilian; his wife, Carolota. Napoleon's French Army had not been defeated in 50 years, and it invaded Mexico with the finest modern equipment and with a newly reconstituted Foreign Legion. The French were not afraid of anyone, especially since the United States was embroiled in its own Civil War.

The French Army left the port of Vera Cruz to attack Mexico City to the west, as the French assumed that the Mexicans would give up should their capital fall to the enemy -- as European countries traditionally did.

Under the command of Texas-born General Zaragosa, (and the cavalry under the command of Colonel Porfirio Diaz, later to be Mexico's president and dictator), the Mexicans awaited. Brightly dressed French Dragoons led the enemy columns. The Mexican Army was less stylish.

General Zaragosa ordered Colonel Diaz to take his cavalry, the best in the world, out to the French flanks. In response, the French did a most stupid thing; they sent their cavalry off to chase Diaz and his men, who proceeded to butcher them. The remaining French infantrymen charged the Mexican defenders through sloppy mud from a thunderstorm and through hundreds of head of stampeding cattle stirred up by Indians armed only with machetes.

When the battle was over, many French were killed or wounded and their cavalry was being chased by Diaz' superb horsemen miles away. The Mexicans had won a great victory that kept Napoleon III from supplying the confederate rebels for another year, allowing the United States to build the greatest army the world had ever seen. This grand army smashed the Confederates at Gettysburg just 14 months after the battle of Pueblo, essentially ending the Civil War.

Union forces were then rushed to the Texas/Mexican border under General Phil Sheridan, who made sure that the Mexicans got all the weapons and ammunition they needed to expel the French. American soldiers were discharged with their uniforms and rifles if they promised to join the Mexican Army to fight the French. The American Legion of Honor marched in the Victory Parade in Mexico City.

It might be a historical stretch to credit the survival of the United States to those brave 4,000 Mexicans who faced an army twice as large in 1862. But who knows?

In gratitude, thousands of Mexicans crossed the border after Pearl Harbor to join the U.S. Armed Forces. As recently as the Persian Gulf War, Mexicans flooded American consulates with phone calls, trying to join up and fight another war for America.

Mexicans, you see, never forget who their friends are, and neither do Americans. That's why Cinco de Mayo is such a party -- A party that celebrates freedom and liberty. There are two ideals which Mexicans and Americans have fought shoulder to shoulder to protect, ever since the 5th of May, 1862. VIVA! el CINCO DE MAYO!!

Mexican Holidays: Cinco de Mayo

 

Introduction
The holiday of Cinco De Mayo, The Fifth Of May, commemorates the victory of the Mexicans over the French army at The Battle Of Puebla in 1862. It is primarily a regional holiday celebrated in the Mexican state capital city of Puebla and throughout the state of Puebla, but is also celebrated in other parts of the country and in U.S.cities with a significant Mexican population. It is not, as many people think, Mexico's Independence Day, which is actually September 16.

Historical Background
The battle at Puebla in 1862 happened at a violent and chaotic time in Mexico's history. Mexico had finally gained independence from Spain in 1810, and a number of internal political takeovers and wars, including the Mexican-American War (1846-1848) and the Mexican Civil War of 1858, had mostly wiped out the national economy.

During this period Mexico had accumulated heavy debts to several nations, including Spain, England and France, who were demanding payment. Similar debt to the U.S. was previously cleared after the Mexican-American War. France was eager to add to its empire at that time, and when Mexico finally stopped making any loan payments, France used the debt issue to establish its own leadership in Mexico by installing Napoleon's relative, Archduke Maximilian of Austria, as ruler of Mexico.

Archduke Ferdinand Maximilian


France invaded the Gulf coast of Mexico and began to march toward Mexico City. Although American President Abraham Lincoln was sympathetic to Mexico's cause, and for which he is honored in Mexico, the U.S. was involved in its own Civil War at the time and was unable to provide any direct assistance.

Gen. Ignacio Zaragoza

Marching on toward Mexico City from the coast, the French army encountered strong resistance at the Mexican forts of Loreto and Guadalupe. Lead by Mexican General Ignacio Zaragoza Seguin, a small, poorly armed militia of about 4,500 were able to stop and defeat a well outfitted French army of 6,500 soldiers, which halted the invasion of the country. The victory was a glorious moment for Mexican patriots and is the cause for the historical date's celebration.

 

Unfortunately, the victory was short lived. Upon hearing the bad news, Napoleon had found an excuse to send more troops overseas to try and invade Mexico again, against the wishes of the French populace. 30,000 more troops and a full year later, the French were eventually able to depose the Mexican army, take over Mexico City and install Maximilian as the ruler of Mexico.

Maximilian's rule of Mexico was also short lived, from 1864 to 1867, ending as the U.S. began to provide more political and military assistance to Mexico to expel the French. Despite the eventual French invasion of Mexico City, Cinco de Mayo honors the bravery and victory of General Zaragoza's small, outnumbered militia at the Battle of Puebla in 1862.

Today's Celebration
For the most part, the holiday of Cinco de Mayo is more of a regional holiday in Mexico, celebrated most vigorously in the state of Puebla. Though there is recognition of the holiday throughout the whole country, it's nothing like that found in Puebla.

Celebration dancersCelebrating Cinco de Mayo has become increasingly popular along the U.S.-Mexico border and in parts of the U.S. that have a high population of people with a Mexican heritage. In these areas the holiday is a celebration of Mexican culture, of food, music, beverage and customs unique to Mexico.

Commercial interests in the United States and Mexico have also been successful in promoting the holiday, with products and services focused on Mexican food, beverage and festive items. Increasingly more cities in the U.S. and Mexico catering to a festive consumer are also more than happy to provide a venue to celebrate, so that Cinco de Mayo is becoming adopted into the holiday calendar of more and more people every year.
(Updated April 04, 2002)
 

 

 

B

I

N

G

O

Salsa

 

 

Dances/bailes

Five/cinco

Mexican/

Mexicano

Conquest/

conquistar

 Music/musica

 

 

Flowers/flores

Fiesta/party

Independence/

independencia

French/

frances

Green

 

 

White

FREE SPACE

Maracas

Zaragoza

Triumph

 

 

Battle of Puebla

tortilla

freedom

chile

Red

 

 

May

piñatas

parades

sombrero

Cinco de mayo BINGO

 

 

Mid School Spanish

  • Spend some time on Dualingo (at least 5 minutes a day)
  • Make flash cards with the conjugations of the verb tener-to have (tengo, tienes, tiene, tenemos, tienen-I have, you have, he/she has, we have, they/you all have). Teach the conjugated forms to someone in your family.
  • Practice using the verb tener (See website page)

Spanish I

  • Spend some time on Dualingo (at least 5 minutes a day)
  • Make vocabulary flashcards for foods we eat for breakfast (desayuno), lunch (almuerzo) and dinner (cena). Include fruits (frutas), vegetables (vegetables/legumbres) and drinks (bebidas).
  • Go over er/ir ending verbs. See chart below. Focus on the verbs: comer-to eat and beber-to drink.
  • REGULAR –er verbs

    Stem                                              +                             ending

    (everything except the er                                     (o, es, e, emos, en)

    INFINITIVE  FORM  (un-conjugated verb)

    Comer-to eat

    Subject Pronoun

    STEM

    ENDING

    Conjugated verb

           

     Singular Forms

    1st persona

    yo

    com

    o

    (Yo) como

    2nd persona

    com

    es

    (tú) comes

    3rd persona

    Él/ella/usted (ud.)

    com

    e

    (Él) come

    (Ella) come

    Usted come

    Plural Forms

    1st persona

    Nosotros (as)

    com

    emos

    (Nosotros) comemos

    (Nosotras) comemos

    3rd persona

    Éllos/ella/ustedes (uds.)

    com

    en

    (Éllos) comen

    (Ellas) comen

    Ustedes comen

     

     

    REGULAR –ir verbs

    Stem                                              +                             ending

    (everything except the ir                                     (o, es, e, imos, en)

    INFINITIVE  FORM  (un-conjugated verb)

    Vivir -to eat

    Subject Pronoun

    STEM

    ENDING

    Conjugated verb

           

     Singular Forms

    1st persona

    yo

    viv

    o

    (Yo) vivo

    2nd persona

    viv

    es

    (tú) vives

    3rd persona

    Él/ella/usted (ud.)

    viv

    e

    (Él) vive

    (Ella) vive

    Usted vive

    Plural Forms

    1st persona

    Nosotros (as)

    viv

    imos

    (Nosotros) vivimos

    (Nosotras) vivimos

    3rd persona

    Éllos/ella/ustedes (uds.)

    viv

    en

    (Éllos) viven

    (Ellas) viven

    Ustedes viven

    Go over verb activities-see website.

Carmen Torres

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Contact Carmen Torres

Classroom Number:
31
School Phone:
575-854-8131
Home Phone:
575-854-2439
Conference Time:
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